☀ (banerry) wrote in whatnancysaid,

banerry
whatnancysaid

The Quest of the Missing Map

In an effor to find buried treasure and help her friend Ellen, a live-in piano teacher (really), Nancy repeatedly puts a child's wellbeing in danger. Everyone else is pretty cool with this.


"The mere mention of a mystery quickened the pulse of eighteen-year-old Nancy.
I hear there's a medication for that.
She dropped her art books and portfolio on the hall table and glanced into the living room.
'Come in, dear,' said Mrs. Gruen. 'You're home early.'
'Art school was dismissed at two-thirty today,' Nancy replied." (page 1)
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Oh boy, she's picked up a new hobby to be the absolute best at! How exciting!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Nancy, I'd like you to meet Ellen Smith,' the middle-aged, kindly housekeeper said.
Hannah: "She holds the honor of having what is quite possibly the most generic name in the world!"

'You've frequently heard me speak of her." (page 1-2)
Nancy: "Oh, is she the one you call an annoying bi--"
Hannah: "BE QUIET!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


"'Ellen has a lovely voice,' Mrs. Gruen put in. 'A few weeks ago she sang on TV, and her teacher is urging her to
Hannah: "... never do it again."
devote all her time to music and becoming a soloist.'
'If only I could!' Ellen murmured wistfully. 'But already I've borrowed a lot of money and I'm worried about how to pay it back.
Say, this plotline is starting to sound familiar
...
I want to take the position at Rocky Edge because it pays well, but the place and the people have an air of mystery about them that scares me.'" (page 2-3)
Ellen: "I'm kind of a pansy."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Mrs. Chatham wants me to live there and give Trixie piano lessons.
Are "live-in piano teachers" common among the rich?
The mother is a strange person, a widow,
I know, it's just so weird when people's spouses die!
and frustrating at times.' Ellen turned to Hannah Gruen and said, 'Won't you please go with me to see Mrs. Chatham and talk about the position?'
The housekeeper smiled.
Hannah: "Not a chance in hell, sweetie."
'Why not take Nancy? She's had a lot of experience meeting strange people.
Hannah: "Some might even say she is one herself!"
If Nancy thinks it's all right for you to accept the position, I'm sure it will be.'" (page 3)
Hannah: "She is all-knowing, after all."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As Ellen talked, Nancy could not help but wonder, 'Is Ellen's decision difficult to make because of the mysterious story I heard Hannah mention? Is it connected with the position at Rocky Edge? Or is some other mystery haunting Ellen?'
To be fair, Ellen sounds like the sort of person who's scared by a hat dropping.
As the two girls left the Drew house and walked toward the driveway, Nancy remarked to Ellen, 'I heard Hannah say something about a mysterious story.
Ellen: "Nancy, why are you salivating like that?"
'It has to do with a map and a buried treasure,' the other girl replied as they stepped into Nancy's car.
Nancy hoped to hear more about the buried treasure as they rode along, but Ellen turned the conversation
Because buried treasure is a boring, mundane line of conversation that's easily dropped.
toward the two girls' interest in art:
You mean the interest of Nancy's that's never been  mentioned before this book, and will probably never be mentioned again after it? That interest?
one of them in music, the other in drawing and sketching.
'What are you specializing in?' she asked Nancy.
'Drawing figures and faces,' Nancy replied." (page 4)
Nancy: "So, nudes, basically."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When Hannah Gruen worked for my family years ago, she taught me lots of children's songs. Hannah was really wonderful to my family. I was always sorry she left, but when Mother and Dad returned from their trip around the world, Mother took charge of our home herself.'
'My mother,' said Nancy, 'died when I was only three and Hannah Gruen has taken care of me ever since.
Nancy: "Looks like I win this round of the Trauma Olympics!"
She's like a member of the family." (page 4-5)
Nancy: "And she's mine, do you hear me? Mine!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
"[Ellen] went ahead of Nancy and pressed the bell. Almost at once the door was flung open. The two callers found themselves facing a little girl.
'I don't know what you're selling!' the child cried out. 'Whatever it is we don't want any! So go away!'" (page 5)
She clearly has a bright future in dealing with telemarketers ahead of her.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"After carefully replacing the small ship, Nancy heard a sound behind her. At the same moment she caught a reflection in the mirror above the fireplace. What she saw sent icy chills down her spine. A wall panel behind her had slid open. A bearded man with cruel, beady eyes was watching her every move.
'Leave here at once and never come back!' he warned in a rasping voice." (page 10)
Gollum?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"For an hour and a half [Nancy] enjoyed the recital and was proud of Ellen Smith, whose vocal solos were the best numbers on the program and received the most applause." (page 16-17)
Well of course; she's a friend of Nancy's. Everyone she meets is infected with Mary Sue Syndrome (unless they're evil)!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy was afraid that since Ellen needed the money so badly she would accept the position immediately. She was greatly relieved, therefore, when the girl replied:
'I'm sorry, Mrs. Chatham, but I can't possibly give you my answer for at least a week!'
'Why, that's ridiculous!' the widow protested haughtily. 'You can't expect me to keep the position open indefinitely.'
...
'She's a pain,' George remarked with a grimace.
'I certainly wouldn't want to work for her,' Bess stated." (page 18-19)
It's almost like people have their own schedules and timetables and can't work their lives around the whims of Nancy's friends! How rude!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Are you an expert at finding lost maps, young lady?' Mr. Smith asked, a twinkle in his eyes.
'I've had some success with them,' Nancy answered, matching his teasing tone." (page 21)
That's such a lie. I don't remember the book about that.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When she finished the conversation, Nancy told Hannah the plans. 'And tomorrow I'm going to the Emerson College dance with Ned, you know. It's the big year-end party of the Dramatic Club. I'm so sorry Bess and George couldn't accept Burt and Dave's invitations. When the boys heard this, they decided to
Nancy: "-- hook up with each other instead."
attend a fraternity convention, so I won't see them.'" (page 32)
... Fraternities have conventions?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The upper floor of the Smith home suddenly was illuminated. Ellen's mother raised a window and called to ask what was wrong.
'Hello, Mother,' said Ellen. 'I'm afraid our home has been robbed.'" (page 36)
I like how casually they had her say that.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'That's what I call a low-down trick,' Mr. Smith fumed. 'Now who could that scamp be, and why  should he want the map?'
'Obviously to obtain the treasure!' exclaimed Ellen. 'Oh, Dad, the parchment must have genuine value! And to think we've lost it!'
'You forget that I made a copy of the original,' Nancy reminded the others." (page 37)
Nancy: "And those chumps on e-Bay will never know the difference!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Ellen could remember nothing about [the burglar] but his surprising strength.
Ellen: "And those muscles! *swoon*
Nancy, however, not only provided the police with an excellent description of the heavy-set thirty-year-old
Okay, no, I don't buy that she knew his exact age, okay?
prowler, but drew a rough sketch of his face.
Nancy had recognized the close resemblance between the intruder and the 'apparition' of Ship Cottage but did not mention this.
No sense in providing the police with all the relevant information, of course.
'Say, you're something of an artist!' the sergeant said admiringly." (page 38)
Oh, kill me now.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Just before they left, Nancy walked out on the front porch. She saw a man and a woman dart from the side of the house and hurry to a car which had been parked up the street. The automobile was too far away for her to distinguish either the make or the license.
'That's queer,' she thought. 'I wonder if they were just curious bystanders or if they had some part in the robbery.'" (page 38-39)
Or since they're acting just like you usually do, maybe they're amateur detectives.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy drove leisurely along a winding country road. A gray automobile followed some distance behind. She did not give it a second thought until she had gone several miles.
'Why doesn't that car pass me?' Nancy wondered." (page 39)
Maybe because they're not tailgating and they don't want to go any faster than you? Just a thought.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Ned studied the crude drawing. 'It looks like a lesson in geography. Half a lesson at that.'
'That's just what it is-- half a map showing where a treasure's buried.'
'Belonging to Captain Kidd?'" (page 46-47)

Oh, Ned. You should grow a spine and make fun of Nancy more often.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Ned grinned. 'Guess I won't be seeing much of you for a while with two mysteries to solve-- especially when you're off to some lonely island.' Then, with a wide grin, he added, 'Unless we go sailing for gold together!" (page 47)
Nancy: "Try it and I'll throw you off a cliff."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


"At the fraternity house, [Nancy] was greeted by Mrs. Haines, the
Underwear model?
housemother
Oh.
and several young women." (page 47)
Oh, my.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I'm so glad you called,' [Hannah] said, her voice unsteady.'
'What's wrong? You sound upset.'
Nancy: "U mad?"
'About half an hour ago a man phoned. He didn't give his name, but he had the most unpleasant voice!'
'What did he say?'
' "Lay off the Tomlin matter or you'll be sorry." Those were his exact words. Oh, Nancy, that warning was meant for you.
Nooooo. You think?
And to think that I suggested you take an interest in the Smiths' problems!'" (page 49)
Hannah, to be fair, you know she would have done it anyway.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *






"'As you all know, it is our custom each year to select an attractive young lady to preside over the event. She will wear the Festival Robe and Crown. After careful consideration by a committee of faculty and students,
... This is the weirdest fraternity event ever.
a choice has been made.'" (page 50)
Yeahhhh I'm not even going to bother typing up the rest because we all know who it's going to be.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When the lights had been extinguished during the pantomime, a masked man, whom Nancy had assumed to be one of the players, had glided her to the side.
'Come with me!' he had commanded.
Thinking that it was part of the show, Nancy had obeyed." (page 52)
Nancy, for the world's biggest Mary Sue, you sure are too dumb to live sometimes.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *






"'Don't make a move or try to escape,' he rasped as the woman removed the gag. 'Just hand over the map and you won't be harmed.'
Nancy squirmed sideways on the car seat, peering at the woman who gripped her arm.
'So it was you who switched off the lights,' Nancy remarked." (page 52)
OH MY GOD, NANCY. SHUT UP.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy tore herself from the woman's viselike grasp and jerked open the car door." (page 55)
Rule #1 of kidnapping: always lock your prisoners in. Even if they're stupid enough to just go off with you in the first place.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I was kidnapped. Ned, it was the same couple who followed me this afternoon. But we must keep the whole thing quiet.'
'You mean you're not going to notify the police?' Ned demanded disapprovingly.
Ned, that's the second sensible thing you've said this book! What is wrong with you?
'No, not until I've talked to Dad. For now we must pass off my disappearance as a joke.'
The boys frowned at each other, then Ned spoke. 'Jeff Garwin went inside a minutes ago to call police headquarters. I suppose you want me to try to stop him.'
'Please do, Ned,' Nancy replied. 'I don't want any publicity.'

... Nancy, honey. You do realize that people don't call the police about emergencies just because they want the attention, right?
While Ned hurried into the building, she and Bill Tomlin walked at a more leisurely pace.'
Nancy: "So... wanna make out?"
Nancy related the highlights of her harrowing experience." (page 57-58)

Nancy: "And then I just opened the door-- it was unlocked! Can you believe that?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'... Why not stop and talk to my father? He owns the Elite Department store and no doubt will be in his office there.'
Any relation to the Elite Drug Store?
'I hope he won't think I'm prying--'" (page 58)
... But Nancy, you will be prying.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy inquired about Captain Tomlin, the third in his family to follow the sea. The store owner confirmed that the man had died many years ago while on a voyage to Japan." (page 60)
Mr. Tomlin: "We all regret that he never got to see the kawaii desu shores of glorious Nippon."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Instinctively Nancy darted after the terrified child. She seized her by the hand and jerked the little girl from the roadway just as the automobile whizzed by.
Kids in the Nancy Drew verse  really love running out in front of cars, don't they?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Perhaps we can get in through a window,' George suggested, testing one on the front of the house.
She could not raise it nor any of the others.
'I wonder if I should ask Mrs. Chatham for the key,' Nancy mused." (page 66)
I like how that option came to mind only after they tried to break in on their own.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'You keep the studio locked, I suppose?' Nancy inquired.
'Usually I do," Mrs. Chatham replied. 'For a while I left it unlocked thinking Trixie might like to play there. But she refused to step inside!'
'Did you ever ask her why she dislikes the place so much?'
'It would do no good,' Mrs. Chatham said. 'She has a very vivid imagination and tells outlandish stories.'" (page 67)
Mrs. Chatham: "Every once in a while I consider actually listening and paying attention to my child, but what good would that do!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy decided to tell Mrs. Chatham about her strange experience with the studio. The woman was upset about the man behind the sliding panel." (page 69)
Mrs. Chatham: "Gee golly whiz, I sure am glad you waited a few days to bother telling me that there's a strange guy hanging around in the house where I encourage my young daughter to roam free!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"A wooden peg which seemed to secure the wide panel to the sheathing drew her attention. As she fingered it,
Oh yeahhhh, baby.
Nancy felt a slight movement. Between the boards she could see a tiny crack of space.
'I've found the opening!' she thought jubilantly." (page 70)
Nancy: "I wonder how many more weeks I should wait before I tell Mrs. Chatham about this!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Goodness!' Bess exclaimed nervously. 'There must be a secret passage connected with the studio.'" (page 72)
As usual, Bess is woefully behind everybody else.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I'm not as thin as you are, Nancy!' Bess complained as she attempted to follow. 'I'll never make it!'" (page 72-73)
Bess: "Oh, I'm such a fatty-fat-fattykins! I wish the ghostwriters had decided to give me some personality traits beyond 'scared of everything' and 'likes food'!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"As Nancy mulled over the matter, she absently raised the lid of a leather-covered box. She stared in surprise and delight. Inside carefully wrapped in tissue paper, were many large, rare sea shells.
'Mrs. Chatham, did your first husband collect these?' she asked breathlessly.
'Yes, he did. He loved the sea and everything connected with it.'
Mrs. Chatham: "It was... kind of a fetish, actually."
'You never mentioned your first husband's last name,' Nancy said, waiting eagerly for the answer.
'Why, I thought I did. His name was Tomlin-- John Tomlin.'
'Tomlin!' Nancy could hardly believe her ears. 'Then he may be related to Tomlin Smith!'" (page 76-77)
So by this logic, I might be related to author Kristin Hannah because her last name is the same as my first name.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'He never spoke of his father?' Nancy asked, fingering a large pink shell." (page 77)
There's an innuendo there, I'm sure of it.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"... the metal box contained only two objects-- a small key and a bankbook. The name of the depositor was John Tomlin. Nancy had hoped it would be John Abner Tomlin. The bank was in New Kirk, a seacoast city, and there was a large sum of money on deposit.
'No doubt this key unlocks his safe-deposit box in the same bank,' George put in.
'I must go to New Kirk at once,' the widow declared.
Nancy spoke up. 'You may have some trouble at the bank. You'll probably need proper identification and notarized papers. Why not discuss the situation first with my dad?'" (page 87)
Nancy: "I'm sure he can forge something for you."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I do have another idea, though,' [Nancy] went on. 'Perhaps the man that George spied coming out of the concealed opening knows about the missing map!'
'What!' her listeners chorused.'" (Page 88)
What! The guy who's been sneaking around might have stolen something? You really think so?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy gave her father an account of her recent adventures, describing her abduction by the Browns and their unexpected appearance at Rocky Edge." (page 94)
Carson: "So, just a typical Thursday then?"
Nancy: "Yep, pretty much."

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy led [Trixie] to an anteroom and took the crayon sketch from her handbag.
'I have a picture to show you,' Nancy said. 'This is a drawing I made last night.'
The child gave a muffled shriek!" (95)
Trixie: "What is that man doing to that poor goat, Nancy?!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I can be ready in fifteen minutes,' Nancy laughed. 'How about plane reservations?'
'I made them by phone,' Mr. Drew put in.
'Did you hire guards to watch your house?' Nancy asked Mrs. Chatham.
'Yes, two men are there.'
Nancy looked at Trixie, then drew the woman aside. 'Perhaps Ellen Smith could come to your house and take care of Trixie while we're away.'
Mrs. Chatham: "Oh, I knew I was forgetting something! Someone needs to watch my young child! Better hope Ellen is okay with less than an hour's notice."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'And now I have something for you.'
[Nancy] handed [Carson] the crayon sketch of the Ship Cottage 'ghost' and told him of Trixie's positive identification.
'I'll tell the police,' he offered, studying the face. 'I hope Trixie was sure and not just frightened by the sinister-looking face.'" (page 97)
Carson: "Or the sodomy of farm animals... did you really have to draw that in, Nancy?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"At bedtime Nancy was summoned to the telephone. Mrs. Chatham, who had been calling her home, said Ellen Smith wished to speak to her.
'Oh, Nancy,' Ellen said in a strained voice, 'please don't stay away any longer than you have to. I didn't want to frighten Mrs. Chatham, but her place is terribly spooky, with creepy shadows in the garden. Twice I've called to the guards but no one answered. I don't believe they're even on duty.'" (page 99)
Ellen: "But remember, we shouldn't tell Mrs. Chatham. It's only her daughter that's in potential danger, after all."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"They hailed a taxi and rode to Rocky Edge. As the cab rolled through the open gate, Nancy observed that no guards were on duty.
'Shouldn't at least one of the special detectives be stationed at the gate?' she inquired.
'They aren't detectives,' Mrs. Chatham replied. 'My gardener knew two strong men who were out of work, so we gave them the job.'
Mrs. Chatham: "In other words, I hired two strangers with no qualifications to watch over my home and child while I was away, and to keep it safe from the man we know for a fact has broken in several times. That's all right, isn't it?"
Shortly the taxi pulled up in front of the main house. As Nancy and Mrs. Chatham stepped out, a servant came rushing up to them.
'Oh, Mrs. Chatham,' the young woman said, puffing, 'what are we going to do? What are we going to do?' she repeated hurriedly. 'I'm so sorry, so very sorry.'
The widow put a comforting arm around the girl's shoulders and tried to remain calm. 'Now tell me what the problem is,' she said. 'No one's had an accident I hope.'
'No, no,' came the sobbing reply.
Mrs. Chatham's face grew stern. 'Well, then tell me what's going on,' she said, raising her voice abruptly.
'Trixie is missing!'" (page 104-105)
Oh, no! But she was so safe and well cared for! Clearly no one could ever have seen this coming.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy had been silent, not wanting to interrupt the woman's conversation with her employee. But now she inquired if Ellen Smith and Hannah Gruen had left.
Tears trickled down the young woman's face. She answered, 'They both went away right after lunch. Miss Smith had to leave because of a singing lesson. And your housekeeper, Miss Drew, left because she couldn't get anything to eat. The cook resented her being here and wouldn't even make her a sandwich, much less let her into the kitchen to fix her own meal.'
'Where are the guards?' Nancy asked.
'Oh, they got better jobs, so they left.'
... What the fuck? I seriously hope none of these people are hired to look after anything, much less a kid, ever again.
Nancy coaxed the girl to tell as much as she could about Trixie's disappearance.
'She's been gone close to two hours,' was the reply.

Servant: "After about forty-eight or so I guess we might have called the police."
Mrs. Chatham spoke up. 'Have you searched everywhere? Over the cliff-- and down by the river?'
'Yes, Madam, everywhere.'
Mrs. Chatham seemed relieved by this statement. 'Then Trixie has run away! Well, this isn't the first time. She'll come home.'
I don't wish to alarm you, Mrs. Chatham, said Nancy, 'but I'm afraid she may have been kidnapped.'
The widow gasped. 'Then we must call the police at once!'

Yes, call the police and report yourselves for child neglect and endangerment. This is the best idea I've heard so far!
As the child's mother started towards the house, Nancy followed closely. When they entered the hall both noticed a sheet of paper lying near the telephone.
'What's this?' Mrs. Chatham asked, picking it up.
At a glance she saw that it was a ransom note." (page 105-106)
... It's been lying there for two hours and no one saw it before they did?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I don't want to pay the money,' Mrs. Chatham stated, then said, 'But what will happen to Trixie if I refuse?'" (page 107)
Mrs. Chatham: "On the other hand, it's clear that I never really cared that much anyway... and I really, really don't want to pay the money!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'I think I should call the police,' Mrs. Chatham said nervously.
'Please wait until we've had an opportunity to search the grounds thoroughly,' Nancy advised." (page 107)
Nancy: "Please continue to put aside your child's welfare in lieu of helping me solve my mystery. You've done such a great job of it so far!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy groped for the peg which opened the secret panel. As the wall slid back slowly she was almost certain she heard a movement in the dark chamber.
'Trix--'
... are for kids.
she started to call.
At that same moment a hard object struck Nancy and she blacked out. (page 108)
Trix Rabbit: "'Silly rabbit', they say? I'll show them!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Mrs. Chatham was so relieved to see her daughter she barely listened to Nancy's explanation of what had happened to Trixie." (page 110)
Mrs. Chatham: "Oh, thank goodness my gross negligence didn't have any real consequences!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Police were stationed at the house and the cottage." (page 111)
But then they got better jobs, so they left.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy did not reply. She was thinking, 'I wish we could start on that cruise right away!'
Bess exclaimed, 'This excitement has given me a big appetite!'" (page 115)
But since a stiff breeze gives her a big appetite, that's nothing unusual.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"That afternoon Carson Drew made several more unsuccessful attempts to find a suitable yacht. The few that were offered to him were either too large or much too small." (page 122)
Narrator: "But then he found Baby Bear's yacht and it was just right!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"One afternoon the child was not in sight when Nancy arrived. Ellen ran down the walk to meet the young detective, who sensed at once that something was wrong.
'Trixie has disappeared!' Ellen cried. 'I'm sure she has been kidnapped again!'" (page 123)
Good god. Who is this kid, Princess Peach?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Had the kidnappers dared to abduct Trixie Chatham a second time? Nancy could not believe they would be so foolish." (page 124)
Well, since they got away with it with no consequences the first time...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy's preparations for the trip were at their height later that morning when she received a telephone call from Chief McGinnis of the River Heights police force.
'We have a lead, Nancy,' he said. The chief was a long-time friend of the Drews. 'Spke Doty's address.' He rattled off the number and name of the street.
Chief McGinnis: "Now, you won't tell the other guys on the force about me illegally telling you this, right?"
'It's a rooming house.'
'That's in the worst district of town,' Nancy commented." (page 126-127)

Nancy: "No WONDER he's a criminal!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"One [letter], however, was addressed to her in pencil and had been mailed the day before. The message inside had been scrawled on a sheet of cheap tablet paper. It read:
Dear Miss Drew: I tuk yer boat
cus I need money but I can't sell it.
You can hev it back for a few bucks.
It says somethin important inside.
Don't tell the cops and come alone
on foot to 47 White Stret.
They spell "important" right, but can't nail "took" or "have"? Uh.
Nancy read the message a second time, then ran to the kitchen to show it to Hannah.
'This practically shatters one of my best theories!' she declared.

Nancy: "The scientific community will be ROCKED by this discovery!"
'I had a hunch that the ship model had been stolen by Fred and Irene Brown. This note seems to prove I was wrong.'" (page 133-134)
Nancy: "After all, it's not like anybody ever lies or tries to trick me."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"[Nancy] paused a moment. 'It's a long distance to White Street, but this note says to come on foot--'
'Nancy, I can't permit you to walk through that area!' Hannah Gruen exclaimed.
Hannah: "There might be black people there!"
'I'll take the car,' Nancy said." (page 134)
Nancy: "That counts as 'on foot', right?"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Securely bound, Nancy was shoved through a closet door which connected with an adjoining vacant house. She was seated at a table and told to write a letter to Hannah Gruen. Nancy was to request that the piece of map found in the ship model be sent to her at once.
'Don't try to get away with anything in this letter,' Frank Brown threatened.
In despair, Nancy slowly composed the message. She knew she could not include anything that would indicate her true predicament.
Nancy: "Okay, let's see... 'Dear Hannah: I need the map because I've been kidna--', No, no, I can't put that! I'll try again. 'Dear Hannah: Under pain of death, I've been ordered to--' Oh, drat! This is so hard!"
There was just one faint hope of outwitting the sinister couple. Accordingly she wrote:
Please give bearer the copy of the map found in the ship model.
Nancy

Now, as long as Hannah isn't completely brain-dead, that'll sound pretty suspicious.
'Perhaps if I concentrate very hard, I can get a thought wave to Hannah so she'll make a copy-- but not an exact one,' Nancy told herself. 'It's my only hope.'" (page 136-137)
Nancy, are you serious. Are you serious right now.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"It isn't like Nancy to stay away so long without any explanation,' the lawyer declared as Ned parked at the curb.
Are you sure? Because it seems to me that she does it a lot.
'She may have walked into a trap.'" (page 137)
Carson: "Let's find Hannah and ask her if she's received any telepathic messages lately."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy, you're safe!' [Hannah] exclaimed joyfully. 'Oh, I'm so relieved.'
'Did someone come here with a note from me?' Nancy asked anxiously.
'Yes, a woman. She left about ten minutes ago.'
'That was Irene Brown!'
'I guessed as much, so I tried to call the police, but the telephone wires had been cut.'
'You gave her the map?' Nancy asked.
'That was what you requested me to do,' the housekeeper responded.
... Oh, Hannah. Hannah.
'Yes, I did. Oh, I can't blame you. You had no way of knowing that I didn't want you to carry out the instructions.'
Nancy: "Especially since we had your brain removed and replaced with turnips a few years ago."
'All the same, I guessed it from the wording in your note,' the housekeeper declared, ending the suspense.
But not the stupidity.
'I gave Mrs. Brown a map, but it will never do her or  her husband any good. And it serves them right.
... Oh. Why didn't she just say that in the first place?
'Oh, Hannah, you're wonderful!' Nancy laughed happily and hugged her." (page 142-143)
Nancy: "You've given our readers hope that you don't have the IQ of a sea cucumber!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Ned, I think we should tell the captain that Spike might have placed a bomb aboard or tampered with the machinery.'
The two reported the incident at once and a thorough search was made. Nothing was found.
Although Nancy was relieved, she had an uneasy feeling that something was amiss. She would certainly keep her eyes open." (page 148)
But no need to inform the woman who would be bringing her young child aboard the yacht, of course. It's already been determined that no one cares about Trixie's safety.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"What's all the commotion about?' [Mrs. Chatham] asked.
'Bess went overboard,' Nancy replied. 'We don't know why.'" (page 150)

I assume she saw a bit of food go overboard first, and dove in after it.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Bess said haltingly, 'I asked Dave to get my sweater from the other side of the yacht.
Because he's her personal bellboy, I guess.
While he was gone, I rested my arms on the rail over there and suddenly it gave way.
And nobody noticed the collapsed railing afterwards?

I would harp on the fact that they brought a little kid on board a yacht that's clearly in a state of disrepair, but I think that's a lost cause at this point.
I screamed so you wouldn't leave me behind.'
As Bess finished her explanation, Bill Tomlin arrived on the scene. He went to examine the rail. Finally he said, 'This is part of a gate which wasn't latched properly.'
George turned to Nancy, 'Do you think it was a case of sabotage?'" (page 151)

Unlatching a gate: the height of sabotage.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The next day Nancy came on deck to find a tough-looking young sailor at the wheel of the Primrose. She did not like is appearance and recalled that Captain Stryver had been compelled to hire any available men.
But then they got better jobs, so they left.
'Good morning,' she greeted him pleasantly. 'I'm Nancy Drew. Your name?'
Dude, that's not pleasant; that's kind of assholeish and demanding.

'Snorky.'" (page 151)
Good God. What is he, a Muppet?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Please don't get into a fight with Snorky,' Nancy pleaded." (page 152)
Nancy: "He's supposed to be presenting the letter "S" today, and if he storms off in a huff there'll be no one left to do it!"
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"I don't think we should leave Snorky in charge,' said Bill. 'He's taking us directly eastward.'" (page 153)
I'm going to be honest: I could not give less of a shit about Snorky's motivations for steering them off-course. To me, the real mystery is how they can all keep saying his name with straight faces.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Next, Nancy asked Ned to slip into the forecastle and hunt for a clue among Snorky's belongings. His possessions did not reveal anything suspicious. Ned ran his hand under the mattress of the sailor's bunk.
Ned: "That's weird. It's strangely sticky."
'Here's something!' he thought, holding up a small envelope.
It contained an odorless white powder.
Ned decided to smoke it, just for curiosity's sake.
Ned felt certain that Snorky had used some of it to taint the ship's food. He reported his find to Nancy.
'I have an idea!' she said.
Nancy ran to the galley and grabbed a large salt shaker.
Nancy. This can go nowhere good.
She took a small plastic bag from a drawer, then hurried back.
'Ned, substitute this salt for the powder!' she said. 'Put the white powder in this plastic bag. We'll keep it for evidence.'" (page 154-155)
Okay, but why take the salt shaker, again?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Snorky is sly,' Nancy observed to George as they discussed the situation. 'We'll have to tighten our watch. If we don't, I'm afraid something dreadful may happen before
Nancy: "-- he can tell us how to get, how to get to Sesame Street."
we reach Little Palm.'" (page 155)
Something dreadful like being poiso-- oh.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'That Heyborn fellow in white claims he owns the island,' Ned explained. 'He won't permit us to land or to dig.'" (page 161)
Protecting his property? How dare he!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Please let us search,' Ellen pleaded. 'It means so much to Mrs. Chatham and my family.'
'Sorry, I can't allow that,' he said irritably.
Ned and Ellen would have pressed the matter further but Nancy gave them a warning glance.
'I can see your point of view,' she said
Bullshit.
to the owner. 'We'll leave at once.'
Her friends stared, aghast.
Nancy was being reasonable and considerate for once? Unbelievable!
A few minutes later, on the way to the yacht, they demanded an explanation.
'I wanted to throw him off the track,' Nancy told them." (page 161-162)
Nancy: "Don't worry, we'll be back to trespass and dig up his land the second he turns his back!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Somehow we must look inside [Heyborn's cabin],' Nancy whispered. 'I suspect that the real owner of the island may have been taken prisoner by the man who claims to be Heyborn.'" (page 163)
Nancy: "I mean, the guy turned down a group of random strangers who landed on his island and demanded to dig the place up! He can't be the real owner."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"'Let me have your flashlight, Ned,' [Nancy] whispered. 'I think a woman is lying on the bed, bound and gagged.'" (page 163)
Kink-shaming isn't nice, Nancy.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"When [the real] Mr. Heyborn heard the entire story, he was amazed.
Mr. Heyborn: "His name is Snorky, you say?"
He assured the young people that he would not interfere with the Tomlin treasure hunt."
'Dig to your heart's content,' he urged them generously. 'My wife and I came here to enjoy a peaceful existence. And our son loves it. I'm a naturalist, connected with the American Museum, and have been studying the flora of the island. All I ask is the privilege of continuing my work without interruption.'" (page 167)
Mr. Heyborn: "I mean, if that's okay with you. I'm only the owner, after all. Treasure-hunters clearly get dibs."
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Once more Nancy got up, poked her head out, and looked to the deck above. The young sailor who had announced the disappearance of Snorky was leaning over the rail. He smiled down at her.
'I have an important note for you from Mr. Rorke. I can't bring it down because I'm on duty. Please come up and get it.'
Intrigued, Nancy replied, 'Okay.'" (page 168)
Nancy, how are you still alive?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Nancy was not in sight. Because of the weight of the tarpaulin she had plummeted straight down. There was enough air inside it so she could breathe for a few minutes and Nancy struggled hard to free herself. But her attempts for futile. She knew now that she would die of suffocation rather than drown.
'Poor Dad!' Nancy thought. 'And I promised him I'd be careful.'
If it's any comfort, Nancy, I'm sure he knew you were lying.
Then, after praying a little,
she added, 'I don't want to leave Ned and Bess and George and Hannah, too-- all the people I love!'
Suddenly, Nancy became aware of something touching her." (page 170-171)
Cthulhu?

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"By this time Bess, George, Dave, and Burt had been awakened by the young sailor. Having thought over the episode of the note, he had begun to suspect trouble. The young people had rushed to the deck and were puzzled to find the crewman unconscious.
Considering everything that's happened, why is this "puzzling" instead of "horrifying".
Just then two heads broke the surface of the water. The onlookers were aghast to see Nancy and Ned, now taking in great gulps of fresh air.
'They have on regular clothes,' Bess commented. 'What happened?'
Oh my God, Bess. They obviously did not go for a nighttime swim, okay? I just can't with you.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"A half hour later everyone gathered in the captain's dining room. In order not to alarm Trixie, Nancy had requested that no mention be made of what had happened." (page 172)
Guuuurl, after all this, she's going to end up in therapy anyway. Don't even bother; it's a lost cause.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"That evening when [Nancy] and Ned were on deck gazing at the moon, he said, 'Nancy, how about taking your mind off mysteries for a while and thinking of me instead?'" (page 178)
And speaking of lost causes...
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Tags: annoying little kids, bess and george, child neglect, hidden treasure, kidnapping, ned nickerson, villains with hilarious names
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  • 6 comments
HFUJSLKAHGDLKA;GJFHDALK AN UPDATE OMG YAY

I'd quote my favourite part, but I'd end up reposting almost all of the entry haha


I have a question. When you edit this post with new quotes, will it appear at the top of my friends list again, or will I have to keep checking back here? Or could you make a new post letting your followers know when you've updated this post or something like that?
Unfortunately it won't move it back up to the top of your friends list-- but if you'd like, I can definitely make posts letting people know that I've updated! Thanks for the idea. :P
Awesome, I can't wait for an update :)
I'm glad you like them! ♥
Okay, the kawaii desu comment made me LOL :D

I can't wait for more!
fff thank you. XD I hope to have more up soon!